Welcoming 10 New Carrier Oils

November 17, 2016

The harvest has arrived with the introduction of 10 new carrier oils. From Guava Seed to Safflower, our bountiful picks were selected for their unique therapeutic properties. Nourish your skin with Fenugreek or add Prickly Pear Seed into your beauty routine. Select your favorites or try all 10. We know you are going to love our latest additions as much as we do!

Cucumber Seed: Throughout history cucumbers have been praised as a cooling botanical for soothing excess body heat due to changing life cycles and out-of-balance temperaments. It has a neutral odor with just a hint of cucumber essence. Cucumber Seed contains a variety of fatty acids: omega 3’s and linoleic, keeping the skin soft and nourished. It is often used in lotions, massage oil, body butter, hair care and other body care products to soothe and support the skin.


Fenugreek: This fascinating little brownish-yellow seed from a relatively common plant is the reason why many curries emit their distinctive aroma: sweet, maple and a sensory magic carpet ride to India and beyond. While the oil carries a faint sweetness, it is quite enticing and alluring. On its own, mixed with other carriers or with a dash of an essential oil, it enlivens, nurtures and softens the skin.

Guava Seed: One of our more unique carrier oils, Guava Seed adapts to virtually any essential oil added to it with superior absorption and moisturizing among its many benefits. Extracts of Guava Seed are utilized in shampoo, cosmetics, haircare and skin products. A few drops of your selected Edens Garden essential oil or blend will catalyze this exceptional carrier oil into a revitalizing part of your daily health regimen. A splash in a bath, applied liberally in a stress reducing massage or a dollop gently rubbed into rough skin on elbows or feet – Guava Seed re-establishes luxuriant softness.

Neem: The Neem plant is revered for its diverse attributes within India and many other countries. Neem is often a key active ingredient in soaps made in India. It is supremely moisturizing and a superb base with which to add essential oils. On its own or with the addition of select essential oils, it is especially supportive of cuticles, nails, rough spots and patches of troubled skin and scalp. It makes a wonderful skin conditioner, supporting a healthy and smooth appearance to the face and body.

Pomegranate Seed: A ‘must have’ for anyone seeking an all-purpose oil for blends or for use on its own as a replenishing and soothing skin rescuer, Pomegranate Seed is exceptionally penetrating. It is highly regarded for use in a wide variety of skin care products and for supporting lymphatic massage treatments. Cold pressed and refined it is naturally high i, triglycerides and omega 5 fatty acid. It’s naturally occurring Vitamin C content makes it a favorite for all skin applications, especially for mature skin. 

Prickly Pear Seed: This glistening oil is extracted from the seeds of Prickly Pear Cactus native to Mexico and naturalized to the Southwestern United States. Lore and legend for this oil extends back to ancient times and it is still praised for its bountiful support of skin, scalp, hair and nails. Luxurious and soothing, it is a favored ingredient in body care lotions, crèmes and herbal balms created to soften the skin surface while pampering skin tone and elasticity. It makes an ideal addition to any carrier oil blend for facial care.

Safflower: The use of Safflower oil dates back to ancient Egypt and is ideal in almost every purpose as a carrier for use with essential oils. On its own or blended with essential oils it is a great way to add luster, sheen and body to hair, while supporting skin and scalp health. This pleasant carrier oil is a very mellow way to add desirable glide to massage oils... soothing skin, joints and muscles.

Sunflower: This legendary plant with a cheery flowering head resembles the sun and has long had an association with happiness. The joyful flower heads follow the sun across the daytime sky, soaking in the life-giving rays with abundant pleasure. Our Sunflower oil is extracted from the highly nutritious seeds and delivers a very body-friendly carrier oil. It is quite economical for those seeking an affordable carrier oil treasure. It is used equally in commercial products for a wide range of body care preparations.

Tamanu: In Tahiti and surrounding islands it is referred to as Foraha oil, and has been relied upon for its wide ranging health benefits, especially for every imaginable skin issue. It is a good moisturizer and therapy for adolescent skin challenges. This oil is so thick and effective that it can be diluted with other carriers. From scalp to feet, this carrier oil is superior in many ways. It absorbs well, has a nutty and pleasant aroma, and its luxurious feel makes it ideal for use in lotions, creams, ointments and other cosmetic products.

Wheat Germ: Extracted from the nutrient-dense center embryo, Wheat Germ is known as the germ of the wheat kernel. It contains vitamins A, B, D, E, and is supportive for cracked skin, chaffing and deep massage. Wheat Germ Oil is dark in color and has a pleasant, but strong aroma, so dilution with other carrier oils is a common practice before applying to the body. It is soothing and replenishing and a natural source of abundant fatty acids valued for their skin, scalp and hair nurturing properties.

COMMENTS

  • Edens Garden says...

    Hi Michelle! The prices are available on each products page :)

    On November 23, 2016

  • Michelle Pichler says...

    What is the costs of these oils I’m very interested!

    On November 22, 2016

  • Edens Garden says...

    Hi Pam! Carrier oils are used to dilute essential oils when using them topically. They are nourishing and moisturizing to the skin.

    On November 21, 2016

  • pam says...

    what are carrier oils?

    On November 18, 2016

  • Edens Garden says...

    Hi Carli! For specific ailments and advice we suggest seeking out a certified aromatherapist. Find one here- http://naha.org/find-an-aromatherapist

    On November 18, 2016

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