The Best Essential Oils & Blends For Your Skin

by Danielle De Guzman July 23, 2020

The Best Essential Oils & Blends For Your Skin

This content was update for accuracy and relevance on November 4th, 2020

Are you hoping to support the youth of mature skin, improve your skin tone, or combat acne prone skin? Essential oils can be a powerful aid for skin care. Most essential oils are powerful antioxidants, which means they may help combat damage from environmental pollutants and UV rays. However, many have specific properties that make them well-suited for certain skin types and issues. 

Do you know your skin type but aren’t sure what skin products you need to maintain a fresh face? We have created a list of some of our favorite and most effective essential oils to use on a variety of skin types. Whether you have dry, oily or combination skin, you have come to the right place to find the best essential oils for skin care. Read on as we explore essential oils for different skin types. 

1. Age Defy Synergy Blend

Aging gracefully is something we all dream about. Instead of injecting your skin with paralyzing serums or slathering on strange chemicals, you can incorporate the Age Defy Synergy Blend into your daily routine.

Signs of aging are often caused by inflammatory damage. When environmental pollutants and UV rays penetrate the skin, it can create unstable particles driven to bond with others, thus spreading the damage.

Adding a few drops of Age Defy into your go-to lotion or carrier oil is a natural way to reduce the appearance of fine lines.

2. Skin Love Synergy Blend

Like other pure essential oils, Skin Love Synergy Blend has anti-inflammatory and calming properties. In addition, it is formulated to help boost cell regeneration and support glowing and radiant skin.

Skin Love contains powerful, skin-loving oils like Frankincense, Sandalwood, Lavender, Helichrysum, Chamomile, Rose, and Rosehip CO2. This makes it one of the most appropriate essential oils for skin with scars or stretch marks.

3. Frankincense & Myrrh Synergy Blend

You probably already know that Frankincense has been a valuable perfume for millennia—after all, it’s listed in “We Three Kings” as one of the gifts to a baby Jesus. But interestingly enough, it’s also been used in Ayurvedic medicine and other traditional practices for the following purposes:

  • Helping promote even skin tone

  • Helping reduce the signs of aging

  • Helping heal minor cuts and scrapes

Frankincense is a resin with proven anti-inflammatory qualities, and modern science continues to suggest its usefulness in skincare. In 2017, researchers Xuesheng Han and his colleagues noted that Frankincense essential oil can help reduce inflammation and aids in tissue repair.

Because many of the signs of aging are caused by cellular damage from UV, pollutants, and inflammation, Frankincense can be one of the best essential oils for dry skin and aging skin.

Like Frankincense, Myrrh has been a valuable substance for centuries. Myrrh is the sap of a thorny tree native to Northeast Africa and was prized in Egyptian Medicine. It’s also used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to hasten wound healing.

Current research suggests Myrrh may help:

  • Improve skin redness and irritation

  • Reduce itchiness

  • Combat inflammation

This can make Myrrh oil a great aid for dry, sensitive skin that is prone to irritation. Our Frankincense & Myrrh Synergy Blend also contains Cedarwood, Cistus, and Vanilla CO2, giving it a uniquely warm and exotic aroma.


4. Rose Bulgarian Absolute

Rose is thought to help moisturize dry skin and reduce the appearance of wrinkles. Dior’s team of scientists has analyzed the chemical composition of roses at length and discussed their findings in Scientific American. They find that rose:

  • Helps contain micronutrients

  • Is full of skin-nourishing fats

  • Can help effectively treat under-eye skin to reduce dark circles

However, you don’t need to buy high-end cosmetics to experience the benefits of Rose essential oil. Instead, you can incorporate Rose Bulgarian Absolute into simple homemade skincare remedies.


5. Tea Tree Essential Oil

Did you know Tea Tree essential oil can work wonders for oily skin type? Tea tree essential oil has been used medicinally in Australia for over 100 years and is now known for its strong antimicrobial properties. 

In a review of current research, Christine Carson, Professor at the University of Western Australia, and her colleagues note Tea Tree’s proven ability to help combat viruses, bacteria, and inflammation.

As bacteria and other microbes can be the root cause behind acne, this essential oil may actually help oily, blemish-prone skin.


6. Palmarosa Essential Oil

Researchers studying the effects of Palmarosa essential oil and Tea Tree essential oil found that both essential oils can help combat acne—and they work even better together. We’ve always said, two oils are better than one. 

7. Sandalwood Essential Oil

Sandalwood essential oil has been used in clinical trials to support healing the following skin conditions:

  • Blemishes

  • Skin irritation

  • Warts

  • Bumps and raised spots

In a 2017 review of scientific literature, researchers note that Sandalwood has proven antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory effects. These can make Sandalwood essential oil a great aid for improving blemishes and uneven skin texture. Sandalwood may also help reduce signs of aging. Consider adding this ingredient to your skincare routine if you are battling with acne-prone skin. A few drops mixed with a carrier oil for proper dilution can help improve stubborn blemishes and texture. You can choose from carrier oils such as Jojoba oil, Sweet Almond oil, Avocado oil, Argan oil, Apricot Kernel oil, Fractionated Coconut oil and more.

8. Eucalyptus Essential Oil

Eucalyptus is a powerful anti-inflammatory plant better known for its effects on helping clear respiratory inflammation. However, it can benefit your skin, too. 

Long used in Brazilian folk medicine, recent studies confirm Eucalyptus essential oil is:

  • Anti-inflammatory

  • Analgesic

These properties can make Eucalyptus EO a great choice for treating dry, itchy, and irritated skin, and for helping reduce the signs of aging. Eucalyptus works to help reduce fine lines and wrinkles on the skin.

Eucalyptus can also aid the skin in absorbing other essential oils. Add it to blends to magnify other oils’ effects. In addition, eucalyptus works to combine with your natural oils to avoid excessive oils and instead give you a hydrated and healthy appearance.

 

Putting Your Essential Oils To Use

Now that you’ve reviewed the most helpful and pure essential oils for skin, you’re probably ready to start experimenting.

When applying essential oils to your face we recommend using a carrier oil. This way, you can hydrate and treat your skin all at once without risking irritation especially for those with sensitive skin.

We recommend using:

  • 4 oz carrier oil of your choice

  • 0.25 tsp pure essential oil of your choice (or a blend of 24 drops total)

This will produce a 1% dilution for safe application to your face.

To further enjoy the benefits of the best essential oils for face care, check out our favorite face mask recipe below.


DIY All-Skin-Type Face Mask

Gather the following ingredients:


Then, follow these steps:

  1. To choose which essential oils to add to your face mask, pick 2-3 of the oils discussed above. You can use an equal amount of each oil chosen, or use blending techniques. 

  2. Dilute your essential oils with Tamanu carrier oil.

  3. Combine bentonite clay to form a paste.

  4. Stir in warm water. Add more water until the face mask becomes smooth.  

  5. Apply the mask, avoiding the eyes, and leave on for 10 minutes.

  6. Wash the mask off using warm water and a cloth.

  7. Optionally, apply a moisturizer after removing the mask, especially if you have dry skin.

You can always try out a mask with just one essential oil to observe its individual effect. As you get to know your oils, mix and match until you arrive at the perfect mask.


The Edens Garden Difference 

Want to try out several types of essential oil for skin care support? Only at Edens Garden, can you create your own set of essential oils—choose between 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 oil sets options. Consider adding oils such as Roman Chamomile, Carrot Seed, Geranium or Clary Sage. No matter what you select, you can rest assured you’ll experience the best of botanical skincare. Make sure to check out our incredible Roll-On essential oils to make your skincare a quick and easy experience. If you’re curious about other forms of aromatherapy such as natural body products to add to your daily skin routine, check out our full line of high-quality all-natural body care products

Sources:
1. Han, Xuesheng et al. “Biological activities of frankincense essential oil in human dermal fibroblasts.” Biochimie open vol. 4 31-35. 3 Feb. 2017. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5801908/

2. El Ashry, E. S. et al. “Components, therapeutic value and uses of myrrh.” Pharmazie 58.3 (2003): 63-168. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12685809/

3. Dume, Bell. “For Better Skin Care, Start With Better Combinations of Ingredients.” Scientific American 4 May 2018. https://www.scientificamerican.com/custom-media/for-better-skin-care/

4. Carson, Christine, K. A. Hammer, and T. V. Riley. “Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties.” Clinical Microbiology Reviews 19.1 (2006): 50-62. https://cmr.asm.org/content/19/1/50.short#sec-17

5. Kim, SunHee, SunYoung Lee, and Shunhua Li. “The Effect of Essential Oils from Tea-tree and Palmarosa on the Acne Skin.” Korean Journal of Aesthetic Cosmetology 11.6(2013): 1083-1090. http://e-ajbc.org/journal/view.php?number=678

6. Moy, Ronald L, and Corey Levenson. “Sandalwood Album Oil as a Botanical Therapeutic in Dermatology.” The Journal of clinical and aesthetic dermatology 10.10 (2017): 34-39. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5749697/

7. Silva, Jean et. al. “Analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils of Eucalyptus.” Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 89.2-3 (2003): 277-283. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0378874103003131


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1 comment

Florence

October 9, 2020 at 10:08 am

Thank you so much for all this great information. I will be putting some blends together. I would love to have a print button :)