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AAA: How Can I Prevent Pain After Exercising or Physical Labor With Essential Oils?

by Bella Martinez September 16, 2020

AAA: How Can I Prevent Pain After Exercising or Physical Labor With Essential Oils?

Do you experience pain after completing laborious work or exercise? Is it keeping you from performing tasks? If you’ve answered “Yes” to either of these questions, it’s time to put the kibosh on pain post-physical activity.

Introducing essential oils for pain to the rescue! 

Find out how our favorite natural remedies can help prevent pain and get you on the move again. 

Essential Oil Constituents That Reduce Pain

While we know that there are essential oils that help ease aches and pains, what gives these essential oils their pain-fighting abilities? When it comes to essential oils that stop pain on the spot, you’ll want to look for oils that contain plenty of these beneficial constituents.

Alpha-Pinene

A monoterpene responsible for giving plants and oils such as Pine their fresh aroma, a-pinene is highly therapeutic and is known for its pain-relieving abilities. 

  • A study on several monoterpenes found a-pinene to be efficiently antinociceptive and moderately anti-inflammatory.[1]

  • Subjects treated with a-pinene-rich Frankincense oil exhibited less pain and swelling than those treated with a placebo.[2] 

  • Doctors in Turkey aimed to discover the antinociceptive activity of the major constituents in Fennel oil, and found a-pinene and fenchone to have the strongest potential.[3] 


Oils containing a significant amount of alpha-pinene include:

Beta-Caryophyllene

Pronounced  care-ee-oh-fy-lean or /ˌkærioʊˈfɪliːn/ if you’re phonetically inclined, b-caryophyllene is another helpful monoterpene that puts a stop to pain before it starts.

  • Beta-caryophyllene showed anaesthetic-like activity both in vitro and in vivo after five minutes of application.[4]

  • In a lab study, b-caryophyllene was found to boost the effects of morphine when used in combination with each other, thus reducing the need for a higher morphine dosage and lowering the undesirable side effects of morphine.[5]

  • Italian scientists investigated the analgesic activity of b-caryophyllene, and found it to be effective when diluted in Sweet Almond oil in both in vitro and in vivo studies.[6]


Oils containing a significant amount of alpha-pinene include:

Linalool and Linalyl Acetate

Two of the most well-researched essential oil constituents and yet another monoterpene (and ester), linalool and linalyl acetate’s ability to ease pain is legendary. 

  • A study on Lavender showed its unique pain-relieving ability which was attributed to its main constituents–linalool and linalyl acetate.[7]

  • A similar study performed at the University of Sassari in Italy found that the antinociceptive activity of linalool to be significant.[8]

  • Lavender oil and its key constituents–linalool and linalyl acetate–were found to significantly reduce pain after 60 minutes of inhalation.[9]


Oils containing a significant amount of alpha-pinene include:

How to Use Essential Oils to Prevent Pain

Now that you’ve put together your dream team of pain-stopping essential oils, you might be wondering how to use them most effectively. Here are some of the most effective ways to prevent pain after physical activities. 

Roll-On Essential Oils to Roll-Away Pain

Before you go about work or exercise, apply this healing roll-on formula.

Add to the following to a 10 ml empty roll-on and shake to combine: 

Essential Oil Diffuser Blend for Pain

Inhaling your essential oils can be just as effective as applying them topically. While you’re working or exercising, diffuse this blend to keep aches at bay. If your job requires you to be on the move rather than in one place at a time, add this blend to aPersonal Pocket Inhaler for on-the-go relief.

Sore Muscle Massage Oil

If after physical activity you’re starting to feel stiffness, soreness and pangs of pain, have a partner or professional use this massage oil to help you feel as good as new. 

  • 1 ozTamanu Carrier Oil

  • 5 drops Indian Peppermint Essential Oil

  • 5 drops Black Pepper Essential Oil

  • 3 drops Frankincense CO2

  • 2 drops  Basil Essential Oil

Take an Essential Oil Bath

While hot baths might be more comfortable, a cold bath is recommended after physical activity to reduce inflammation. To up the ante, addessential oils to your bath in the form of a bath salt or bath oil. Our favorite bath salts for fighting pain and inflammation include:


To make your own bath oil, combine the following healing ingredients, then add it to your bath:


To help disperse your oils throughout your bath, add a solubilizer. Keep in mind that not adding a solubilizer can make the bottom of the tub slippery so use caution when getting in and out.

Can’t Stop, Won’t Stop

Don’t let fear of pain stop you from living your best life. Whether you opt for the suggestions detailed throughout this article or others found at Edens Garden, there is almost no end to the healing solutions that essential oils have to offer. From blends like Aches & Pains and Massage Therapy to Muscle Relief and Circu-Touch, there’s always more goodness to be found here at Edens Garden. 

Sources:

  1. Guimarães, Adriana. “Monoterpenes with Analgesic Activity--a Systematic Review.” PubMed, 27 Jan. 2013, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23296806.
  2. Li, Xiao-Jun. “α-Pinene, Linalool, and 1-Octanol Contribute to the Topical Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Activities of Frankincense by Inhibiting COX-2.” PubMed, 17 Feb. 2016, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26721216.
  3. Him, Aydin. “Antinociceptive Activity of Alpha-Pinene and Fenchone.” Pharmacologyonline, 2008, pp. 363–69, www.researchgate.net/publication/266416515_Antinociceptive_activity_of_alpha-pinene_and_fenchone.
  4. Ghelardini, C. “Local Anaesthetic Activity of Beta-Caryophyllene.” PubMed, July 2001, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/11482764.
  5. Katsuyama, S. “Involvement of Peripheral Cannabinoid and Opioid Receptors in β-Caryophyllene-Induced Antinociception.” PubMed, May 2013, pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/23138934.
  6. Paolo, Fiorenzani. “In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of the New Analgesic Combination Beta-Caryophyllene and Docosahexaenoic Acid.” PubMed Central (PMC), July 2014,www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4109702.

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